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Working in Austria - Advice & Tips

Austria

Expatriate Affairs Consultant Nannette Ripmeester tells you below what it takes to get a job in Austria, where key words are exact, neat, precise and detailed.

Job hunting in Austria

Key words throughout the entire application process in Austria: ‘accurate’, ‘factual’, ‘well organised’ and ‘meticulous’. Be aware of a formal process that requires a lot of input from the candidate.

Especially for small and medium sized companies informal methods of recruitment (word-of-mouth, networking, speculative applications) are not uncommon.

The Application Letter

A letter of application should create enough interest to make the potential employer want to look at your application more detailed by reading your CV and hopefully invite you for an interview. Your application letter, however, should not provide too much information about personal experiences and qualifications; this will be provided in your CV.

The letter is typed and usually a maximum of one to one-and-a-half pages long. Mention your personal skills in addition to your education and practical experience. Give a lot of attention to your education. Remember academic and professional titles carry a lot of importance in Austria. Finish the letter by asking to be invited for a job interview.

The Curriculum Vitae

The key focus of your CV should be to persuade the employer to invite you for an interview. Therefore, your CV is a marketing tool, which should be adapted to the market in which you intend to use it.

The Austrian CV is written in chronological or reversed chronological order. Austrian employers consider extracurricular activities as important.

Attach a photograph of yourself – with your personal details on the reverse side – to your CV. Or scan the photo.

The Application Procedure

Prepare yourself for questions concerning your mid- and long-term career aims. Having a clear plan regarding your self-development is key. Austrian recruiters expect you to have a proposal about what you want to earn - leave room for negotiation though. Expect two to three interviews in the Austrian application procedure.

On-line applications are becoming more common, but do not expect all Austrian employers to use it and/or to favour it.

If we got you thinking about Austria – think about ordering the guide ''Looking for work in Austria''.

About the author

Looking for work in AustriaNannette Ripmeester is the expatriate affairs consultant to several multinational companies, which she advises regarding the strategy of international assignments and the practical implementation around expat issues.  Ripmeester started her international career at the European Commission, has worked on a project basis in 17 countries and is founder and Managing Director of Expertise in Labour Mobility (www.labourmobility.com).
She is co-author of a series of country-specific guides, the guide "Looking for work in Austria", (ISBN-13: 978-90-5896-055-9) is part of that series of guides. To order this guide or other guides that will help you to secure the international job you want, visit our website: www.labourmobility.com.  As a reader of Eurograduate we offer you a 10% discount if you are your copy here.